Oslo's new Harbour Promenade - Articles - visitoslo.com

The Harbour Promenade

Oslo’s new harbour promenade combines sightseeing, history, art, architecture, and a little bit of adventure.

The Harbour Promenade (Havnepromenaden) stretches nine kilometres along Oslo's water front. It ties the city together from east to west, turning different parts of town into a string of great experiences. 

Orange towers show the way

The Harbour Promenade at Langkaia
The Harbour Promenade at Langkaia
Photo: Tord Baklund

Large orange information towers are set up at regular intervals along the whole promenade, to make sure you find your way. The towers are decorated with art depicting comic book detectives Krüger and Krogh hard at work in the promenade area. They also hold boards with information on nearby attractions and the historic significance of the area.

A trip along the promenade

A trip along the harbour promenade takes you through many different parts of the city, both new and old, each with its own characteristics and unique experiences.

Fjord life meets city life at Sørenga

Sørenga Sea Bath
Sørenga Sea Bath
Photo: Tord Baklund

You may begin your trip at Sørenga, a brand new neighbourhood with great views to the city as well as the fjord. The district has become very popular among Osloites, and is a perfect spot to enjoy the warm Oslo summer with music, ice cream and a seawater pool. The area is also popular among kayakers, and features a 300-metre-long lit tunnel that provides access to the Akerselva river.

Some of Oslo's most spectacular architectural sights, such as the Oslo Opera House, and the tall, narrow buildings that make up the Barcode district, lie in the area. At the point where Sørenga and Barcode meet, you find Sørenga Bridge. The previously heavily trafficked bridge has been turned into a park area in the same vein as New York's Highline – a good example of how old structures have been reused in the now hypermodern district.

Shopping, food and art at Aker Brygge and Tjuvholmen

Tjuvholmen, Astrup Fearnley Museum
Tjuvholmen, Astrup Fearnley Museum
Photo: Tord Baklund

Another recommended stop along the promenade is Aker Brygge Wharf, a fashionable shopping and restaurant area. Along the jetty you’ll find some of Oslo’s good options for fine dining, as well as high-end fashion stores in an enclosed shopping street.

Heading past Aker Brygge you will find another newly developed district, Tjuvholmen, which stretches right into the fjord. This upscale neighborhood boasts real Venetian-style canals, used both by resident boat owners and recreational kayakers.

Tjuvholmen also offers restaurants, the Astrup Fearnley Museum of modern art, and residential areas drawn by some 20 different renowned architects. Take the elevator to the top of Tjuvtitten lookout tower for a view of the entire area.

Sporty activities at Filipstad 

Skur 13, Fillipstadkaia
Skur 13, Fillipstadkaia
Photo: Frode Sandbech

The whole harbour promenade can be used for jogging, cycling and other forms of physical activity, but certain parts are especially sports friendly. Skur 13 at the Filipstad docks is an old warehouse that was remodeled into a huge indoor skate park for the X Games 2016. Once the X Games athletes left the park it was turned over to local skaters, and is now open to anyone who wants to try their skating skills in a state-of-the-art facility.

The hall's exterior is decorated with colourful art by the Norwegian artist Pushwagner, and outside you find exercise machines, benches and green areas.

Out in the wild

At each end of the promenade, it turns into costal paths that offer new experiences, or a scenic end to your promenade adventure.

Harbour Promenade map
Harbour Promenade map
Photo: GRID for Oslo Kommune
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