Oslo's fine dining scene

Oslo's fine dining scene

Stimulating the senses 

Fine dining can be interpreted in many ways. Scandinavia has received a lot of attention in the culinary world over the past few years. Not only is the amount of talented chefs on the rise, but many chefs are changing the way we experience food.

– Fine dining to me is when a restaurant focuses on the total experience. It's not only food and wine. They try to stimulate all senses; sight, taste, touch, sound, smell, and last but not least nociception – normally the bill takes care of that, says Pontus Dahlström at the restaurant Kolonialen Bislett.

They try to stimulate all senses; sight, taste, touch, sound, smell, and last but not least nociception – normally the bill takes care of that. 

Pontus Dahlström

A plate at Restaurant Kontrast is like a piece of art
A plate at Restaurant Kontrast is like a piece of art
Photo: Restaurant Kontrast


It's all about the ingredients ...
What makes Scandinavia one of the more interesting leaders in the culinary world is the accessibility to ingredients like foraged herbs, local fish and game. In Norway these ingredients are abundant in the forests, mountains, sea and coast. The simplest of ingredients are often transformed into an edible piece of art.

Historically, Norway's food culture has depended on geography. Culinary traditions have varied throughout the Nordic regions over time. The most common in all of these areas is the preservation of food. Some of the traditional methods of preservation are fermenting, pickling and smoking.  

A plate at Restaurant Kontrast is like a piece of art
A plate at Restaurant Kontrast is like a piece of art
Photo: Restaurant Kontrast


Traditional methods of preparing food have become a norm in many fine dining kitchens. Mixing old culinary traditions with innovative twists is what keeps many fine dining establishments ahead and in the spotlight.

Restaurant Kontrast located at Vulkan and Maaemo, to name a few, are doing just that.

Mikael Svensson from Kontrast focuses on using organic, local and seasonal ingredients from within Norway. 

– The end result is never better than the quality of the product you start with, he says. 

For chefs like Esben Holmboe Bang, head chef at three-star Michelin restaurant Maaemo, the process of creating a dish starts with a memory.

– My challenge lies in how to convey the instant feeling of this memory, to restaurant customers. 

 

– The end result is never better than the quality of the product you start with.

Mikael Svensson

Chefs in the kitchen at Fru K
Chefs in the kitchen at Fru K
Photo: the thief / Fru K



Simplify
You can have a fine dining experience without the fluff. A lot of chefs are stepping away from the typical "fine dining" experience and jumping into creating affordable plates still using quality ingredients with a more relaxed atmosphere.

Pontus Dahlström has done just that. He went from fine dining to creating a more simple concept without losing the integrity of food that he wanted to serve his guests.

– After having my whole career in fine dining it was about challenging myself by doing something totally different. Also the family aspect was important for me. Quality of the ingredients is always the most important in my mind. Secondly the respect and preparation of ingredients. I don't like food that is all about technique and visual. It can be super simple if it tastes good, he says.
 

– I don’t like food that is all about technique and visual.
It can be super simple if it tastes good.

Pontus Dahlström



The overall experience of fine dining is transforming as traditional and new culinary concepts continue to evolve on the plate, stimulating the senses all the while. 

Written by Megan Guertner

Visitoslo.com uses cookies

for statistics etc. By using the site, you consent to our use of cookies. Read more.

Close